Mixed reaction from public to electricity price increase

 

The Electric Power Corporation on Monday announced a $0.09 sene increase in the price of electricity effective from March 1.

The EPC said  the increase applies to all domestic and non-domestic users for cash power and induction meter users. Reporter Soli Wilson meets members of the public to get their views on the increase. 




Sanele Bentley, Salailua Falealili, 49

It’s very hard for the people that are struggling already. It all depends on what the people in these situations do about it. If you have the money it’s not the problem, but imagine if you were one of these families, it will take a lot of money, which is something they don’t have. But in other words, it’s good too, Samoa is developing, and they need to keep up with the demand because these days everything is used with electricity with so many technological advances. We are all moving forward. Prices will eventually rise and yes it’s sad for those who cannot afford but things like these, the Government needs to see it and maybe put up the people’s wages.

 

 

Rudolf Talia, Moataa, 54

They should look at our people, not everyone is the same, a lot of people are not rich and so if they’re looking to increase the prices again, then it’s just going to make it worse for these people. It’s almost a dollar per unit and units don’t take long to finish, and with a lot of EPC projects coming along, they should manage those well – because it seems like they’re looking into recovering their costs through raising prices. A lot of people will be complaining due to this raise, because we’re the ones who suffer. Why have so many projects when at the end of the day it won’t reduce costs for the people? People are going to have many questions.

 

Gregory Ah Sam, Tulaele, 24

There’s always a good and bad side to everything. This raise in electricity prices is going to teach and encourage our people to save, because electricity can be used recklessly. Standards of living is rising, but at the end of the day we have to be smart about it. But on the other hand, it’s also not good because some families are not well-off and this will be a struggle, they’ll be looking constantly for ways to make their cash power last. There are many questions as to why the prices are rising, it’s because they are having so many developments and they need to finance it somehow.

 

Otto Kohlhase, Vaimoso, 23

Standard of living is high but the wages are not good. It’s like the balance is kind of off for most people. Electricity prices are high, goods and services are high and it proves it’s a hard life to live out here with not enough pay provided. The EPC projects need to slow down, if this is how they are doing their stuff is to start slow, one project at a time. They need to give people time to adjust to their changes. I think, if they are looking into raising these electricity prices, surely the public suffers but they can try and help by raising minimum wage to try and balance it out.

 

Lefau Afa Pupualii, Vaoala, 42

I think what’s happening with EPC is that the government is doing a lot of projects and they are looking for ways to raise the funds. Not only are they raising tax, which is mostly where the money comes from, so they need to have so many projects but I don’t think they have enough money. I’m seeing this as another way for them to fund their projects. But most of what they’re doing now is for the betterment of the country. Yes, they have a lot of projects going on, and prices are rising. But it’s not for the benefit of one but the whole country. We don’t have a lot of resources so the ones they rely on is us, the public, and we as the people, we play our part, we pay our tax. Yes, it’s going to be expensive for electricity but it’s all for the progression of our country forward. There are a lot of good changes in our country and that’s a good sign.

 




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