Future Accountant hones skills selling coconuts

By Ilia L. Likou ,

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The Village Voice caught up with Etisone while helping his family to sell coconuts.

The Village Voice caught up with Etisone while helping his family to sell coconuts.

Student Johnny Etisone Tuāfono from Matautu, Lefaga doesn’t want to waste time.

A second year student at the National University of Samoa at Papaigalagala majoring in Accounting, when he is at home, he is one of the hardest working young people out there.

The Village Voice caught up with Etisone while helping his family to sell coconuts.

“I am 22 years old and I have always wanted to do something to help out my family especially during the break,” he said.

“This is my usual routine everyday and I’m used to it, something that I grew up with – that is – to always help my family whenever I can.”

Etisone sells 30 coconuts for $10.

“We earn almost $60 per day,” he said.

“That’s how much we earn from day to day in selling these baskets of coconuts...as we are struggling everyday because of the high cost of living.

“I think it’s very easy to collect coconuts and sell it here (infront of his house), rather than going all the way to the market.

ON A SCHOOL BREAK: 22-year-old, Etisone Tuafonoa.
ON A SCHOOL BREAK: 22-year-old, Etisone Tuafonoa.

“That’s why we have this small stall here to sell whatever we want. At least we don’t have to spend a lot of money in paying for a space.”

He says the problem nowadays is that what he earns still cannot accommodate the high cost of living.

“The prices for all the things in this country have increased from time to time and the pay people receive is not enough to cover [their] everyday needs. 

 “As I’ve told you before, this is why I’m still in school, because no matter how much money we get every day it’s just like nothing.

“Personally, helping my family in every single way and continuing in school - all goes together for the good of my family.”

He understands there are other families in the same predicament. 

 “No problem is too big when we  trust God in everything.”

His only wish is for his family to survive and have a better life.

© Samoa Observer 2016

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