Brotherly love at Vailele

By Deidre Tautua-Fanene ,

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IT’S ABOUT HELPING OUT: Toetu Sefo.

IT’S ABOUT HELPING OUT: Toetu Sefo. (Photo: Deidre Tautua – Fanene)

It was a hot day.

But Toetu Sefo did not mind. The 38-year-old was selling strings of fish on the side of the road at Vailele.

He is from Falealupo, Savaii but he told the Village Voice that what he was selling was not his.

 They belong to his brother.

“We are from Savaii, but my brother is married to a girl from here hence why he is residing here,” said. Mr. Sefo.

“I don’t live here but because I am getting ready to go to New Zealand so I came here to my brother to stay for a short time while I get things ready.”

So why is his selling taui’a for his brother?

“I want to help him out,” he told the Village Voice.

“This is who we are as Samoans we help each other out especially our family.

“I offered to do this because he goes at night and comes back in the morning then he sells this until it’s finish he hardly gets any rest so as a brother I told him that we will work together to help each out.”

Mr. Toetu said this is how his brother earns a living.

“It’s good money but its hard work too,” he said.

“But that’s life there is no easy way when it comes to building our family. We start from the bottom and with all the sweat and sufferings but we will end as winners.

“That’s how it is in life we start from scratch and we will rejoice in the end.

“As for selling fish it’s not a big deal to me as long as I know I am helping my brother in developing his little family.

“His children are his main priority and the reason why he does this for a leaving.

“He doesn’t want his children to miss a day at school and no matter how tired he is he believes that in the future his children will succeed and that he will be the one to gain all the blessings from his children.”

Mr. Sefo went on to say that he gets good money every day from selling taui’a.

“I sell it for $30 and if I sell all of it I get $200 a day which is pretty good,” he said.

“There are good days and there are also not so good days but that’s how it is but we still fight.

“On the not so good days I get $100 tala a day but I believe that is more than what some office people get so everything is a blessing from God as long as it is for a good cause that is all it matters.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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