A lot has changed in Samoa

By Vatapuia Maiava and Ilia L Likou ,

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SAMOA HAS GONE THROUGH MUCH CHANGE: 93-year-old, Simau Pagamalie Faiaso from the village of Vaitele-uta.

SAMOA HAS GONE THROUGH MUCH CHANGE: 93-year-old, Simau Pagamalie Faiaso from the village of Vaitele-uta. (Photo: Misiona Simo)

What seems to be the norm now may not have been in the past.

Let’s face it, most of us haven’t been around long enough to notice the difference.

But  those who have are always willing to share their thoughts with people who would listen.

For Simau Pagamalie Faiaso from the village of Vaitele-Uta, 93 years of life has allowed her to see the transitioning of so many things in Samoa.

“There are many differences with life in Samoa now and back in the days,” she told the Village Voice.

“One of the biggest differences is that people now don’t know much about the way of a Samoan. There are things that people don’t practice anymore because they don’t know how to.”

For Simau, she prefers the life back then, saying that people were more in tune with the Samoan way of life.

“The village life back then was nice,” she said.

“Now it’s different because it seems that no one wants to continue with the Fa’aSamoa. There are many people saying that they are poor because of this and that but they are just whining.

“People are responsible for themselves; families are also responsible of taking care of themselves so if they suffer then it’s their fault.”

With the developing debate of whether or not different commitments are a burden to the people of Samoa, Simau says it’s not that way at all.

“There were those who say that church commitments are the cause of poverty but it’s not,” she said.

“The church is good, that’s where their minds open up. Don’t blame others because it’s your own fault and problem that you’re in that situation in the first place.

“Many people have left the church or faith to go to another because they don’t want to contribute and the same can be said with villages. Those people refuse to serve.

“The church and village commitments are a part of who we are now. Those people just try and dodge responsibility.”

Another big difference for Simau is the level of peer pressure the children are exposed to nowadays.

“Another thing I want to talk about is how different kids are these days,” she said.

“Nowadays, kids are smart and they get their knowledge from their parents; but when they get together and peer pressure comes into play then that’s when they get into trouble.

“They don’t want to listen to their parents and no matter how good a kid is, once they’re exposed to peer pressure then that’s when they leave all their family values behind.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

Developed by Samoa Observer in Apia