A job could help Atapana

By Seia Soloi and Fetalai Tuilulu’u ,

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Twenty one year old, Atapana Simone from Luatuanu’u.

Twenty one year old, Atapana Simone from Luatuanu’u. (Photo: Sei’a Soloi)

It’s is not an unusual story for  many of our youth in Samoa.

When we have seen our parents sacrifice their time, health and youth for us and our siblings, we should return the favor by doing whatever we can to help them out. 

But that will never happen if we are unemployed. 

This is the view of Atapana Simone, aged 21 of Luatuanu’u when Village Voice approached him yesterday.

“Right from when we were born, we have seen our parents struggling to try and provide for us,” Atapana said. 

“They were not only trying to provide for us but they were also the best teachers who taught us what selfless and unconditional love is. We all know we won’t be able to find that love anywhere else. 

“This is exactly why my family and my parents are important to me. 

“And is the only reason why I really want to work to help them. 

“I want to return the favour and I want to do it right now.”

Atapana says life is hard without a job.  

“Like many other people my family has no money and we depend on the plantation for a living. 

“We are rich in love and passion but are not rich in money. 

“No one works in our family, and watching my parents struggle to make ends meet,  is the reason why I need a job.

“We don’t ever worry about food because the land is providing it. Sometimes we only worry about money for church and village donations because these are the things we must contribute to. 

“The value of the dollar isn’t just a saying – it’s a way of life.

“It is how much we need it, how far we’re going to survive without it, and by which we measure our life. 

He said their plantation crops are not for sale. 

“We plant the plantation for food only because there is not much land for a huge plantation here. 

 “But if we really feel the need for money then we sell some bananas to buy sugar and a can of herrings for a meal. 

Atapana believes that God is looking down on his struggles, and that everything will be ok in the end. 

“Storms will pass and tomorrow is a new day. “We never know where our blessings might be and I trust God works in his mysterious ways.  “And if I do get a job, I promise to work to the best of my ability and to be a reliable person. “I can work hard out and I can do anything.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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