Back in the day

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Dear Editor

Old traditional way should be limited

Well written.

My grandparents had 18 children. My grandpa had more with his previous marriages. But all his children were all living together on the same land.

He worked as a night shift guard in various markets in town to provide for his children, especially their education. He held a high ranking position in church.

He was a High Chief of various villages from Upolu to Savai’i.

But he believed that his family comes first. Any benefits from any fa’alavelave would be shared with all the families/community. I recalled him and several of my uncles would go fishing sometimes and whatever the catches were, it was shared by all.

One of the subjects I often hear from my uncles and aunts when conversing or reminiscing about my late grandpa is his rule. Everybody has a responsibility in providing for the family.

If you decide to drop out of school, you’re expected to perform daily chores such as clearing the land of weeds and plant taro, banana, tomatoes, and all kinds of vegetables.

You relegated to kitchen to prepare food for those who are in school and have jobs. He/She must be up at dawn to prepare tea and breakfast for those who are attending school and of course their parents.

He believed in accountability. He lived his life on a simple philosophy that is part of the bible. Raise your children the right way and in return, they will do the right thing when they become adults.

It wasn’t without conflicts, but overall all it made our families today better and very appreciative of everything we have.

His words to his children before he departed this world was take care of yourself and your children first. Anything you can give after your family is taken care of, you can give freely. Do not be enslaved by those who continue to create new traditions and culture to shame our people with their greed.

 

T. Leone

© Samoa Observer 2016

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