Help Vaomua become a Policeman

By Deidre Fanene ,

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Vaomua Ropati, of Moamoa, wants to become a policeman.

Vaomua Ropati, of Moamoa, wants to become a policeman. (Photo: Deidre Fanene)

A 14-year-old has the ultimate dream.

Vaomua Ropati, of Moamoa, wants to become a policeman.

But the 14-year old has a problem.

 “I really want to become a policeman but my parents can’t afford to pay for my school,” he told the Village Voice.

“My parents used to live in Saleimoa and I went to school there but ever since they moved from there, that’s when I stopped going to school.

“I want to go to school but my parents can’t afford it so I decided to come and sell products on the street and help my father out who is the only one working in our family.”

According to Vaomua selling products on the street is a good thing but his desire is to go to school so that he can achieve his dream.

“I’m happy with what I’m doing at the moment because I get to help my father,” he said.

“My father works at one of the shops who does covers for chairs and whatever money he gets he uses it to put food on the table so that we don’t go hungry.

“There are 8 of us and I’m the 3rd eldest and there’s only one person who goes to school which is my eldest sibling.

“Every day I wait until school finishes then I come and sell things like ear buds and car fresheners and the money I make I give it to my dad.”

So how does Vaomua feel when selling things on the street.

“I’m happy but it’s hard because sometimes it’s difficult to sell things nowadays and especially there are a lot of us who do this.

“But I try my best to make sure I finish all my things before I go home.  Some days I make a lot and some days I make little but whatever amount of money I get I get really excited because to me I know I am helping my dad.

“I know some people don’t like us and especially I am one of those kids who were caught fighting with other sellers that was on your newspaper.

“But that was because those other kids beat up my little brother and that’s why I jumped in, but it’s hard selling things on the street because there are so many of us who do this.

“Just as long as I have something to take home I’m happy.

“But I wish I was in school so that I can achieve my goal and be able to get a better job to care for my parents and siblings especially my father.”

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