Woman promotes water promising to change lives

Changing your drinking water could change your life, according to Pearl Va’afusuaga. 

She has been in Samoa recently to share her experiences with Kangen Water, and encourage Samoans to try it.

Ms. Va’afusuaga lives in Auckland, is a Church Minister at Hope Centre New Zealand, and the Manager New Zealand Christian Prayer Line. 

She said when she saw and felt the water’s effects in her young son, and herself, she shared it with her congregation.

“When they start to come back with results and share the results, I was so fulfilled to hear the healing happen and the difference it’s making in their lives,” she said.

Kangen water is produced by a medical device which increases the pH level in water to 8.5 or higher. Regular drinking water usually has a neutral pH of seven. According to Enagic, the company that sells Kangen machines, highly alkaline ionised water can detoxify the body, bringing it closer to ideal health.

Ms. Va’afusuaga was introduced to Kangen water in a presentation, similar to the one she gave to the Chamber of Commerce monthly meeting last week. Sceptical but curious, she took a five litre sample to give her five-year old son Nathanael.

“Nathanael has downs syndrome, and he was always suffering from congestion, and a runny nose,” Ms. Va'afusuaga shared.

“But within a week of drinking that water every day, he dried up. In four years I’ve never seen that.”

The people she shared Kangen water with at church reported back aches vanishing, and diabetic swollen feet reduced to normal. Now she is in Samoa to share her findings with her own people.

“I want the best of the best for my people,” she said. 

“For me I want people to know it’s here, it’s accessible in some way.”

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Internationally, health professionals believe there is not enough research to support the health benefit claims Kangen water makes. For Ms Va'afusuaga, it is enough that she and her peers have felt a measurable difference in their own health.

Ray Hunt is the financial controller at Frankie Company Ltd, and Ms. Vaafusaga’s father. He said last year he was hospitalised from heart issues, and was on the verge of retiring. 

“I had trouble breathing, I couldn’t walk up the stairs at the office without stopping, I couldn’t walk maybe 15 metres without stopping I was so out of breath,” he shared.

Mr. Hunt stayed with his daughter in Auckland over Christmas, and while cynical, he agreed to try the Kangen water. He said he didn’t feel any changes, until a spontaneous walk around the block a few weeks in. 

“After five or six kilometres, I got lost – I felt so good honestly, I wanted to keep going, and I didn’t care where I was walking.”

Kangen water is not a miracle cure, Mr Hunt said. He still has heart problems and continues to take medication for them. Diet and exercise are no less important, but he is able to continue working. 

He has also invested in a machine, and is distributing water for free to his colleagues and staff at Frankie’s, and to anyone else who wants to try.

“I’m hoping I can convince Frankie (Cai) to put one in the office,” he said.

“The people at the office know my history, they are quite taken by this change. I am giving them all water; I can’t help but tell people because I’m so excited by it.”

Kangen water has also been derided for being a multi-level marketing scheme, where people who buy machines are roped into selling them to their communities for commission. But Ms Va'afusuaga and her father do not want any money, or want anyone to buy more machines.

“The sales are secondary to me,” Ms Va'afusuaga said. She is a registered distributer but has only sold one machine, because she has been more focused on sharing the water.

Even when the first woman wanted to buy a machine rather than collect litres of water from Ms Va'afusuaga’s home in Papatoetoe, she was told to wait, because of the expense.

“You shouldn’t try to push it, because of what it does.

“To be honest, I’m happy, I got my family in it so I can go back now,” she said, laughing.

Kangen water cannot be drunk 30 minutes before or after eating, nor taken with medication, Ms Va'afusuaga said. She said will be in Samoa till February 10 and if anyone wants to learn more, call 7602828 or 7609235. 

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