Never forget the land, says Falefa

By Ulimasao Fata ,

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LIVING THE SAMOAN TOUGH LIFE: Falefa Ioane of Lotoso’a Sale’imoa after his work at his plantation.

LIVING THE SAMOAN TOUGH LIFE: Falefa Ioane of Lotoso’a Sale’imoa after his work at his plantation.

Samoans must never forget the benefits of the land.

Yesterday, a 54-year-old father of four shared with the Village Voice team the importance of working the land.

“It is another source of income for our families, especially in today’s struggles,” Falefa Ioane explained. 

The man from the village of Lotoso’a Sale’imoa says locals today are too lazy to return to their land for source of sustenance. 

“The life we have today in Samoa is a really tough one, and to me I think the best way to tackle it is through hard work,” he said. 

“There is nothing to hide about the high cost of living and our people suffer because they rely too much on the exported goods.”

“Some other people in Samoa today have plantations, but they spend money to buy crops from others rather than working on their plantations.”

Mr. Ioane was on his way home from his plantation when he shared with us how his family copes with the standard of living in Samoa today.

“Our family comprises seven people, my wife and I, and our four children, including my elderly mother.”

Two of Mr. Ioane’s children work

“I have two children who work to support us financially, and the other two are still in school.”

“So to me, even though my kids have had jobs, it doesn’t stop me from coming here to the plantation and working here, this is my contribution.”

Mr. Ioane mentioned some of the benefits of working the plantation.

“Working the plantation is another way to earn money apart from spending them on other people, so it saves you money.”

“Plantation is also the best exercise for old people my age because right now some people in their mid 20’s and 30’s can’t walk that much anyways, so this is a good exercise”.

Mr. Ioane added there are also other families in Samoa with members working regular jobs, but they can’t still support their families.

“In Samoa, we also have to support church and village matters and our family obligations.”

He explained: “When all our money is gone towards supporting obligations, then we get our crops from our plantation to cover for our food.”

“Life in Samoa is slowly developing and progressing, our people need to know that we have things to rely on so that we can be able to deal with whatever life throws at us.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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