It’s a life of hardship but hard work is the key

By Ulimasao Fata ,

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Mua Mulitalo.

Mua Mulitalo.

Life in Samoa is not exactly what the tourism brochures promise as paradise.

The reality is that some of the poorest people find daily living a struggle.

Simplicity though is sometimes best.

And that’s how Mua Mulitalo, a 29-year-old father from Falelauniu copes.

Like many families, Mr. Mulitalo said money is always an issue.

 “Me and my wife both don’t work at the moment but we have four children to support,” he said.

“We are living with my wife’s family members and we help each other.”

The limited land at Falelauniu is a challenge.

“We do not have enough lands here to start a plantation for us,” he said.

Mr. Mulitalo met up with Village Voice while he on his way home from helping a mate finish a project.

He shared about how his family is coping.

“Me and my wife are running a canteen around our area,” he said.

“We sell cinnamon and pork buns to the families around here.

“We sell this stuff from Monday to Saturdays. It’s good money but it is hard work. We know what we have to do. We have to work hard for four children and that’s why we will never give up.”

Mr. Mulitalo added many people in Samoa struggle because they are lazy. 

 “We all know that life is hard in Samoa but the only solution is to work harder,” he said.

“Father within families need to work harder. They are supposed to be role models. It doesn’t matter what, they have to work harder and be brave.”

Mr. Mulitalo added that even though his work is hard, but he is happy because it’s the only way that can provide for his children.

 “The work I am doing is very hard. I cover long distances and we have to ensure we sell everything we produce during the day because we can’t save it for the next day. 

 “But the only thing I keep reminding myself is that I love my children and I don’t want to see them starve. I want to ensure they always have enough food and clothes and that’s me fulfilling my role as a father.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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