Cyclone gone from Samoa

By Deidre Fanene ,

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(Image/Luteru Tauvale)

(Image/Luteru Tauvale)

 The latest update from the Meteorology Office yesterday morning at 7am says that Tropical Cyclone Warning Category 2 for Cyclone Amos has been cancelled. 

However tropical cyclone warning Category 1 remains effect for the eastern side of Upolu.

Heavy rain warning remains for Samoa and flood advisory remains in effect for low-lying coastal areas due to high surf.

“Tropical Cyclone Amos Category Three (3) was located at 13.76 South, 171.12 West or at about 95 km East of Faleolo or 72 km East of Apia or 46 km Northeast of Aleipata at 231500 UTC or 04:00a.m early this morning,” said the met office.

“TC  Amos continues to move East- Southeast away from Samoa at a speed of 18 mph. Based on its current forecast track, TC Amos is expected to relocate at about 64 km North Northeast of PagoPago or 113 km East of Aleipata or 150km  East of Apia by 01.00 pm today.  “[But] for today isolated showers expected Southerly winds of 10-20 mph and possibly increase up to 25 mph at times.

“Diminishing storm surge of 10-12 feet.

“Potential Impact – River overflows, Slippery road, Poor Visibility, flooding, landslide and flying objects.”

According to a status made by the Principal Scientific Officer Weather of the MET Office Luteru Tauvale he had an image saying 

 “The image above is an analysis of what is called vertical wind shear, which is simply the difference in wind speed at different levels of the atmosphere as we move from the surface to the upper level,” he said.

“Theoretically, high vertical wind shear near the centre of the storm is generally disruptive to the storm/storm formation, typically for values of 20 knots in the mid-level and more as it can destroy the vertical structure of the storm/cyclone by breaking the link between the low level wind convergence and the upper level wind divergence which is the backbone of the storm. “In this image, it shows vertical wind shear values of around 20-30 knots (yellow lines), therefore slowing the development of Amos.  “This is a life saver for us, BUT things might change very fast.

“We hope that Amos continues to accelerate, and NO U-turn, or a change of speed would become  a different story.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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