Get taro and chopsuey on menus at local hotels

By Adel Fruean ,

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Father and son on a mission - Corey and Xanda Scott.

Father and son on a mission - Corey and Xanda Scott.

A visitor to Samoa’s shores has highlighted the lack of local foods served in Samoa’s hotels. 

Corey Scott from Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand is in love with Samoa’s natural scenery and beauty. 

But he wants to see more of Samoa in the accommodations provided for tourists.

For instance, he suggested that hotels in the country should have more local and traditional foods included on their menus. 

“I wish I could get taro and chopsuey in a hotel,” he said. “I think the food menus in the hotels are more westernized, but then I guess it caters to the needs of the tourists from overseas countries,” Corey said.

“It is also important that countries showcase their traditional foods, it is what makes each country unique in terms of the taste. And I believe Samoan food has a very refreshing taste compared to other cuisines.”

Speaking to the Samoa Observer, Corey said the village setting in Samoa is unique and that is what makes Samoa’s culture different.  

“Especially the traditional welcoming ceremony and the village settings where the Village Council is the supreme ruler, the significance of key values such as respect is shown to all,” he said.  

“I have been to Fiji, Cook Islands but I think that I have more of a connection to the people here maybe it is because I have Samoan blood running through me.”

Describing his favourite spots that he has visited in Samoa, Corey said the To Sua Ocean Trench was the highlight of his trip so far. 

“To Sua Ocean Trench was one of the highlights, it was quite beautiful, really breathtaking to be in the presence of such a unique scenery and we also had the opportunity to see some waterfalls and so we were just amazed by it all.

“We went to see the Robert Louis Stevenson Museum and that showcased so much history and that is what we are curious about as well.”

Comparing Samoa to Fiji, Corey said Fiji has a stronger Australian presence in terms of tourism. 

“But Samoa feels more laid back and you are simply greeted and welcomed wherever you go. I would not change anything about Samoa, it is just perfect in my own eyes just the way it is. A very peaceful country with so many intriguing attributes and that is my Samoa,” the 41-year-old said. 

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