Selling pork buns to earn a living

By Aruna Lolani ,

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A HARDWORKING FATHER: Amosa Moe of Lauli’i.

A HARDWORKING FATHER: Amosa Moe of Lauli’i.

It’s better to use your own talent to earn a living than working for other people. 

So says Amosa Moe of Lauli’i.

The 36-year-old was selling his pork buns filled with chicken and noodles yesterday at Apia Park when the Village Voice approached him.

According to Amosa, it was the best place to be because a lot of people were there to watch the rugby games.

“I came with about hundred pork buns and I’m selling them for $1.00 each."

“Sometimes I sell cans of soft drinks but most of the time I choose to sell these because a lot of people love it.”

This was his way to earn a living for his wife and three children and he started doing this from 2002.

“It’s been too long and I work hard at it because I’m the head of the family and it is my responsibility to feed my them and make sure that they are okay."

“My wife doesn’t work but she takes care of our kids and things at home while I come and walk around to sell these off so I can earn money."

“This is for our children’s education, our food and anything else that we need to survive.”

Amosa said his pork buns are always sold out before the end of the day.

“I think I’ve been to a lot of places in the town area because I walk everywhere to sell these."

“You know the more places I go to, the faster my pork buns sell."

“One of my best customers are the school kids; school days are the only times where I have to make more than a hundred pork buns because you know,  in the morning and when school finishes, there’s school kids everywhere especially at the market."

“So I target the market on Monday to Friday and then on the weekends I just walk to random places in town." 

“For me, I don’t believe when someone says they are not good at doing anything."

“We are from the same God and he has gifted us with different talents so you always have something that you’re good at to help your own life.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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