P.M.’s moves to curtail fights

By Lanuola Tusani Tupufia ,

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To make his point loud and clear, Tuilaepa vows to close down more schools if they continue to get into school fights.

To make his point loud and clear, Tuilaepa vows to close down more schools if they continue to get into school fights.

Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sailele Malielegaoi is serious about closing down government schools of students who get into brawls.

He also has another ace up his sleeve in the form of the control of school funding which he has vowed to use. 

To make his point loud and clear, Tuilaepa vows to close down more schools if they continue to get into school fights. 

Cabinet made a bold stand when they decided to close down Avele for two weeks. 

It follows threats allegedly made by students from the College on social media threatening to attack Maluafou College students and teachers. 

The school was just recently reopened earlier this week. 

“I quite like this; whenever they get into fights we’ll close down the school,” he said. 

“That is the only thing they get because all of these fights are caused by the lack of discipline from the parents. So we close the school it’s a lot easier.” While the government cannot close down any missionary schools where students get into fights, Tuilaepa said that won’t be a problem. 

He has made sure that even the government’s education funds to the missionary schools will cease. 

“The government has no business with the missionary schools,” said Tuilaepa. 

“But it has changed the whole process of distributing the funds. They will no longer be handed to the fat people sitting inside the churches to distribute it. The funds will be paid out directly to the schools and once they get into fights, they get nothing.”

The Prime Minister added that stopping funds to schools that get involved in fights means they will end up closing down. 

“If the parents are listening they should think about taking their children to primary schools and colleges in the villages.” 

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