Fishing is all I have to support my family

By Fetalai Tuilulu’u and Aruna Lolani ,

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FISHING FOR A LIVING: Saula Atina’e and his daughter Ula from Sali’oa Fasito’o uta.

FISHING FOR A LIVING: Saula Atina’e and his daughter Ula from Sali’oa Fasito’o uta. (Photo: Fetalai Tuiluluu)

Fishing is an important activity for our community because there are thousands of people who are making a living from it. 

Besides, fish is a healthy option in terms of the national diet.

Fisherman Saula Atina’e understands this and what it means to the people of Samoa.

The 65-year-old is from Salioa Fasito’o-uta and speaking to the Village Voice, he said fishing is his way of making a living for his family. 

 “I finished school in form five and from then on I decided to become a fisherman,” said Mr. Atina’e. 

 “I sell fish; I sell crabs, lobsters, eels but mostly fish. 

 “I sell maybe four crabs for $20, even eels; four eels for $20. 

 “This is how I make my own money for the family and also to support my kids’ educations.”

Mr. Atina’e had nine children and only has seven now because two of his children died of different illnesses. 

“I don’t have a plantation so fishing is all I have to make money from.

“It’s tough taking care of a family in this way but what’s important here is that my family still get to eat from my work. 

“Everything I get from fishing; I either sell at the market in Apia or sometimes people place their orders and I try to get it for them

“I can’t really be sure when it comes to orders sometimes, you know because fishing everyday is not always the same; sometimes it’s good and sometimes it’s not, so I just work from Monday until Saturday because I don’t want to disappoint or lose these people, in other words, they are my customers right?

“For me, fishing is not an easy thing but I guess having so many years of experience in doing it has  made me feel like it is now. 

“It’s good money but the competition has increased as well so you got to know how to market your own to attract buyers.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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