“It would help if we had a water tank”

By Adel Fruean ,

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BASIC STRUCTURE: The home of Soolefai Faalogo at Falefa.

BASIC STRUCTURE: The home of Soolefai Faalogo at Falefa. (Photo: Areta Areta)

It has only been five months since 52-year-old Soolefai Faalogo from Falefa moved into the area and built a house.

It is not much of a structure and is in fact an incomplete traditional Samoan-styled house, which he shares with his son and daughter-in-law.

Having recently moved to Falefa, Soolefai acknowledges that some of their challenges were expected due to their relocation, though access to clean water is their biggest worry.

“We recently just moved here in July of this year and because of that we have all sorts of problems.

“The first and main priority is access to clean water, due to financial difficulties we could afford to pay for our water to have accessibility in our home.

“My son takes two buckets to be filled with water from our neighbors so we can use daily,” he said. 

Every day they use two buckets of water to cook, wash dishes and even drink, says Soolefai, while indicating that a water tank will immediately resolve their issues. 

“We carefully distribute portions of water for washing our dishes, cooking our food, for drinking water. It would be very helpful if we had a water tank to store our water more easily.

“Because we do not have any running water, we also do not have a waste facility meaning our home does not have a shower or modern toilet,” he said.

WATER: Family uses bucket to get water.
WATER: Family uses bucket to get water.

Currently, the family is using their neighbour’s restroom, which Soolefai says he is thankful for.

“We walk there every day just so we can use the restroom at our family’s toilet nearby when we need it. I am truly grateful to our family for their support in letting us use their homes when we need to for various purposes.”

While the family has a roof over their heads—thanks to their basic traditional house—they worry that with the wet season now underway, things could get worse for them.

Soolefai said one of his sons—who currently lives abroad—assisted to build the house, though it is incomplete. 

“I thank God for my son that lives overseas because it was through him that we were able to have this house and even though it is not finished but we are very thankful. I feel bad for my son because I know he has his own family commitments abroad but still managed to help,” he said.

The house does not have doors, windows or tarpaulins to protect the family when it rains, and Soolefai worries that the bad weather could turn into cyclone. 

“I hope there will not be any cyclones this year or any time soon because we just started and we are not prepared for any more damages that comes with a cyclone. 

“We also don’t have our very own kitchen to cook our food so we just cook everything outside next to our house. I wish the house was completely built so that our home can provide a place to feel safe and secured in,” he added. 

If you are willing to help the family of Soolefai please contact the number 7714971. 

© Samoa Observer 2016

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