Inquiry to scrutinise staff use of assets

By Joyetter Feagaimaali’i-Luamanu ,

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Minister of Justice and Courts Administration, Fa’aolesa Katopau Ainu’u and C.E.O. Papali'i John Taimalelagi.

Minister of Justice and Courts Administration, Fa’aolesa Katopau Ainu’u and C.E.O. Papali'i John Taimalelagi. (Photo: Samoa Observer)

The Public Service Commission (P.S.C.) Inquiry looking at allegations that Court files were removed from the vicinity of Court and taken to the Office of the Minister of Justice and Courts Administration, Fa’aolesa Katopau Ainu’u, has a wider scope.

It is also investigating claims of staff use of Ministry equipment, allocation and management of assets and resources.

This is revealed in the terms of reference for the P.S.C’s investigation.

The P.S.C. also confirmed that Tabitha Salima has been appointed to lead the Inquiry.

The terms of reference goes on to say that the inquiry will also look at the security and release of Court files.

The investigation follows a formal complaint lodged by the Ministry employee, Tulima Pio. He alleges that he personally delivered the Lands and Titles Court files to the Minister’s office. 

The allegation has been denied by the Minister.

Speaking during his weekly media conference yesterday, Prime Minister Tuilaepa Dr. Sailele Malielegaoi, said that complaints lodged by the public have to be considered and investigated by the P.S.C.

It is their duty to do so, he said. 

He said the Inquiry is also an opportunity for the accused to clear their name. 

“Like I said, when the P.S.C.’s attention is drawn to complaints, they are mandated under the law to launch an investigation it is part of their duties,” he said.

“It is also to assess and determine any breaches of the Public Service values, principles and code of conduct in the discharge of official duties by any person appointed under the Act,” he said. 

The Inquiry will also look at issues relating to human resource management within the Ministry as well as the use and access to government-owned vehicles during daily operations.

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