A peanut farmer’s simple recipe for living

By Fetalai Tuilulu’u and Aruna Lolani ,

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FOLLOWING FOOTSTEPS: Omao Talimatau working at his peanut plantation at Falelauniu.

FOLLOWING FOOTSTEPS: Omao Talimatau working at his peanut plantation at Falelauniu.

Meet Omao Talimatau.

The 48-year-old is a peanut farmer from Aele. 

Speaking to the Village Voice team, Omai states that his peanut farm is the source of his family’s livelihood.

“I live at Aele but I come here at Falelauniu to work on our peanut plantation,” he tells the Village Voice. 

“This whole area is seven acres and it’s all covered with peanuts. I’m always happy to come out here to tend to my peanut plantation every day because to me it’s not just a nut but it’s what my family relies on.”

Omao said said peanut farming is in their blood.

 “This is the work my parents used to do back in the days. 

“I grew up looking at how much they earned and I’ve decided to continue with it.”

A father of four, Omao says they make good money.

 “The money we make here helps the family a lot,” he said.

Before the peanuts are ready for harvest, he sells firewood.

But when the peanuts are ready for sale, he said he can make up to $450 a week.

 “We have our usual customers, like shops and markets around Aele to sell and deliver to. 

“The good thing about my peanut plantation is no one would come and steal from it. 

“I know it’s right beside the road but every time I come to work the plants grow well. 

“I guess because people don’t know what grows in here.” 

Omao said his family is doing great.

“Even though I work alone on doing this, our family is doing well,” he said.

“I actually can’t understand why most people are begging for money around town and pretend to suffer. 

“If taro and banana is too hard to grow, we have peanuts, pawpaws, and simple fruits that could also get them some sene. They should just go to work.”

The father says Samoa’s way of life is simple.

 “If you want to eat, you must work, it’s that simple.”

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