Land is God’s gift to Samoa

By Aruna Lolani and Fetalai Tuilulu’u ,

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WE HAVE LAND, WE HAVE EVERYTHING: Peti Lealofi, 35, of Falelauniu ma Tuana’i.

WE HAVE LAND, WE HAVE EVERYTHING: Peti Lealofi, 35, of Falelauniu ma Tuana’i. (Photo: Fetalai Tuilulu’u)

Land is more valuable than money.

Peti Lealofi, 35, believes this. 

It is why she says Samoa must do everything to hold on to their land. 

“When you have land, you have a place of belonging, you have everything,” she said.

“There is nothing to worry about out here. I don’t understand why people complain about the need for money when they can grow their own food and use other things to earn money if they need it.

 “There are so many different development opportunities for people in Samoa because we have land.

“You can start a plantation. There’s nothing difficult about that.”

The woman from Falelauniu and Tuanai is a farmer.

 “For us, we grow all sorts of crops. We have cocoa, bananas, taro, esi and many others. It’s just me and my husband that do the work.”

They have people and companies buying vegetables and crops from them. 

 “People come and buy our crops for $20 or $30 a basket and that’s enough money for my children in a week. 

 “These are the only times we need money but we in Samoa can always eat for free. 

“There are times my husband goes to get us some chicken because my children love eating chicken but other than that, the land will always provide.”

The mother criticizes people who are capable of working yet do nothing.

 “That’s not how we should live. Complaining about not having enough does not do any good. 

“Everyone has been given arms and legs, the only reason you are poor is because you do not use them. I know some people don’t like to sweat. So if you don’t want to work the land, find a job. 

“There are a lot of opportunities out there to be able to provide for families.” 

Peti works hard because she wants her children to succeed.

 “I’m a mother of three children. The one important thing that always pushes me to work is their education. 

 “That’s what my husband and I go on every day, we tell ourselves that my children will suffer if we don’t sweat.

 “As you can see, we are still working on our plantation. It’s not easy but nobody said life is easy.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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