Parents a priority for Tala

By Deidre Tautua-Fanene ,

152 Hits



Parents come first for Tala Tufuga, 31, of Aleisa.

The Village Voice caught up with him at Falelauniu yesterday.

 “I’m on my way to see my parents and do some chores while I’m off from work today,” he said.

“This is my routine, if I don’t work I come here to care for my parents and cook them food and do their chores.

“I believe that there is no greater blessing than the blessings from our parents and there is nothing I want more in this world than to be the one who gets that blessings from them.

“My parents are not the same anymore in terms of their health and it worries me a lot hence why even though I live at Aleisa I still come here whenever I get the chance.”

Tala said he has five other siblings but they all reside overseas so it is his responsibility to care for their parents.

“My siblings send money over for our parents to do what they want as well as their church and village commitment,” he said.

“So my job is to make sure our parents are well looked after.”

Tala went on to say it makes him angry to see other young people wasting their time take bus rides rather than looking after their family and parents.

“I just don’t get it and it makes me angry,” he said.

“I mean think of the sacrifices that the parents did just so we can be who we are right now, “he said.

“They send us to school even though they struggle but at the end taking bus ride all day is how we repay them?

“This is why I decided to move to Aleisa because I knew if I had stayed here longer I would be influenced by this kind of life style.

“I have a job and since I’m single and even though I’m 31 years old my pay goes to my mother that way even though I know I don’t live with them but at least I know I am working for a good cause.

“Family is all we got and we have to priorities the important things in our lives because we don’t want to waking up the next day and those things are gone then we will only live with “what ifs” for the rest of our lives.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

Developed by Samoa Observer in Apia