Working hard for my family

By Vatapuia Maiava and Ilia L Likou ,

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WORKING HARD TO PROVIDE FOR HIS FAMILY: 22-year-old farmer from the village of Saleilua, Falealili, Sinapati Le’aupepe

WORKING HARD TO PROVIDE FOR HIS FAMILY: 22-year-old farmer from the village of Saleilua, Falealili, Sinapati Le’aupepe

Many young lads these days dream of fancy cars, houses and girlfriends; but for a 22-years-old farmer from the village of Saleilua Falealili, his only dream is to provide for his family.

Sinapati Le'aupepe was spotted yesterday at the Fugalei market selling crops from his plantation to earn a bit of money for his parents and family.

“I dropped out of university at the age of 18 and now I am 22 years old,” he explained to the Village Voice.

“I understood that my parents were struggling to keep me in school and it was also tough for me to learn much.

“School may provide many opportunities for us but I decided with my parents that I will do something else to help the family out.

“So since my family has a lot of land in the rural villages we decided that I will go an earn money from the plantation. This is because it only takes seven months for my crops at my plantation to be ready to be brought here to the market to sell.”

For Sinapati, this is the only way his family can live; through his hard work.

“We have nine people in my family and no one is employed, we live on this plantation,” he said.

“We bring baby and mature coconuts, palusami, taro and so on from Monday all the way till Sunday. No matter what we make it’s not enough because we have to put children through school, give to the church and the village.

“I don’t mind giving money to the church because we will get blessed.”

But life as a farmer is great for teaching moral lessons. Sinapati recommends such a hard working life for all youths in Samoa.

“My message to the youth is that we should all try out the life of a farmer,” he said.

“It’s a waste of time and strength to come to town and cause trouble. It’s so much better using that strength to help the family out through a plantation.

“You make money and you are using your time wisely. Taking care of family should always be our main priority rather than hitting your shoulders against others.

“Ever since I dropped out of school I made up my mind that I will never make my family’s life any tougher than it is. I will make things easier for them.”

Providing all that is needed for his family, Sinapati’s only wish is water for his village.

“In my village we are always having trouble with water,” he explained.

“My only dream is that we can get water to the people of my village, even if it’s just a water tank. We try and save up for one but the money goes as fast as it comes.

“The money we make isn’t enough but I want to see the day where we can get a source of water for my family and friends.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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