Farmer’s family lives without electricity and water supply

By Nefertiti Matatia ,

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LIVING COSTS ARE TOO HIGH: Emosi Mata’u heading back from the plantation.

LIVING COSTS ARE TOO HIGH: Emosi Mata’u heading back from the plantation.

Emosi Mata’u continuously faces the challenge of having no water and electricity.

The 40-year-old from Malie is pleading with the government to help address the issues.

Mr. Mata’u says he is in desperate need for help because he is unemployed and he relies heavily on his plantation to earn a living.

He also spoke about the cost of living and how expensive life is these days.

“Everything nowadays revolves around money, no money no food for your family, so in other words, if you don’t work to earn money, then your family would most likely suffer.

“I am keen to see the Samoa Water Authority set up our water pipelines that will reach our home, but I don’t have any money to see this become a reality,” Mr. Mata’u told the Village Voice team yesterday.

He believes people can go on for days living without electricity, but water is the main source of life for mankind.

“There is a big difference between want and need. When you want something, it is just a desire which you could certainly live without, need is a must to have because without it, then you will not only struggle, but at the same time you would die.

“Water is something we do not want, it is what we need in order to survive and make it to the next day,” he added.

Despite his two children working, he said their earnings were still not enough to pay for their bills and put food on the table.

“School will be starting very soon which means there is going to be more money that will be spent on the children in terms of their fees and uniforms. I don’t know where to find the money from,” Mr. Mata’u said.

“I don’t think that the money I earn from selling my crops will be enough to cater to my children’s needs. Both my wife and I do not work.”

Mr. Mata’u added life would have been much easier if the costs of living were lower.

© Samoa Observer 2016

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