Peanuts for a living

By Aruna Lolani and Fetalai Tuilulu’u ,

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PEANUT FARMER: Fa’alelei Fatu of Aele Fou and Falelauniu.

PEANUT FARMER: Fa’alelei Fatu of Aele Fou and Falelauniu. (Photo: Fetalai Tuiluluu)

Peanuts might look insignificant to some people but for others, it represents their livelihoods.

Ask Fa’alelei Fatu and he will tell you all about it.

The 44-year-old farmer is from Aele Fou and Falelauniu.

Faalelei has a plantation of peanuts which he runs with his older brothers.

“With our work, one of my brothers and I are the ones who are responsible for cleaning the plantation and making sure that the lands are secured,” he said. 

“The other two are the ones responsible for growing the peanuts.

“And my eldest brother is the leader in our team.

“He’s the one who directs us on what to do, choose the shops we deliver to; you know he’s basically the manager in our operations.”

Peanuts take a few months to prepare but it is quick cash, he said.

“It takes three months and a few weeks to have these peanuts ready for harvest so it’s always a slow process for us.

“But our hard work always pays off because once we start selling; we mostly we earn about $200 a week. 

“It’s enough for food and other basic needs.

“At the moment, we don’t have electricity but that is another reason why we’re working hard right now so we can be able to afford it.

“I don’t mind though because I understand that nothing ever comes easy if you don’t work.

“I’m also happy that I don’t have a family of my own yet because there will be complications; more difficulties.

“My brothers and I have been into this line of work as long as I could remember.

“And this is not easy work if you do it alone.

“That’s why I’m thankful to have my brothers around because we all shared something in common; and that is having passion for the work we do.

“This plantation, this is life for us because this is how we’re making money to buy the things we need and want.

“But despite all that, without this family, this brotherhood, I probably wouldn’t know how to survive.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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