Teachers upskilling during school break

By Fetalai Tuilulu’u ,

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M.E.S.C. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER: Dr. Karoline Afamasaga-Fuata’i addressing participants at the workshop.

M.E.S.C. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER: Dr. Karoline Afamasaga-Fuata’i addressing participants at the workshop. (Photo: Misiona Simo)

It’s back to school for primary and secondary teachers for part of their school holidays this month.

At the Hotel Elisa conference room at Sogi yesterday, the Ministry of Education, Sports and Culture utilized part of the Term 2 School break to conduct a series of workshops. 

The focus areas are Classroom Based Assessment, Vee-map strategy for teaching and learning, Induction for new teachers with 3 years or less teaching experience and Intervention Support Program- additional support provided to teachers to ensure they meet the professional standards for teachers. 

Part of the workshop included the Public Service Commission and the Ministry of Police who were sharing information on laws and policies relevant to teachers, administrators and the safety of students in our schools. 

The first series of training began for Upolu teachers from Tuesday 04th and will continue to Thursday and in Savai’i it will be from Tuesday 11th to Thursday 13th July. 

An estimated total of 686 teachers will participate in July’s National Training. 

Trainers and facilitators included ACEO’s and staff of the M.E.S.C. and the Classroom Based Assessment session will be facilitated by the staff of the Oloamanu Center. 

The Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Karoline Afamasaga-Fuata’i says the role of a teacher is very important as they not only teach but they build the entire school's capacity to improve. 

“Being a teacher is much more than just executing lesson plans,” she said. 

“In today's world, a teacher's role is a complicated profession; they are in the role of a parent, mentor, counsellor, role model, planner and much more,” she said. 

“They also become the children’s third parents because children that lack a solid family foundation will really benefit from a positive role model. 

“Teachers that portray an image of confidence and accomplishment will help fulfil a child’s need of a positive role model if the family fail to provide such a figure. 

She went on to say the role of the teacher today is very different to what it used to be.  

“Teachers used to be told what to teach, and how to teach it,” she said. 

“They were expected to use the same methods for all students. In today's world of education, a teacher's role is many-sided. 

“Their job is to counsel students, help them learn how to use their knowledge and integrate it into their lives so they will be valuable members of society.

“We are encouraged to really tune into how each individual student learns, and try to really challenge and inspire them to learn.”

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