The poor being left behind, Toga warns

By Fetalai Tuilulu’u and Aruna Lolani ,

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JOB HUNTING: Toga Siaki Ioane, 33, from Lauli’i.

JOB HUNTING: Toga Siaki Ioane, 33, from Lauli’i. (Photo: Fetalai Tuilulu’u )

Life in Samoa might be progressing at hundred miles an hour but poor families are being left behind.

So says Toga Siaki, from the village of Lauli’i.

The 33-year-old caught up with the Villaege Voice yesterday where he expressed concerns about the cost of living.

 “So much has changed in Samoa,” Toga explained.

 “One of the changes is the cost of living and I know you would agree with me on the issue.” 

“It is alright for some developed families but for us we struggle so much to try and beat the prizes of goods. Not every family is rich enough to deal with the changes.” 

Looking back, Toga said things are much harder these days because of the reliance on money.

 “It’s not like back in the days when everything was a lot more affordable for our people,” he said.

“That’s why I miss the old days because we could get things from the shops for some cents. It was also a big help for families like us who don’t have much money.”

But these days are different. If you are poor, you will be left behind.

“Right now a lot of people have to walk long distances just to see which shop sells goods at a lower price so that they can save a few cents.”

“This is also another reason why people prefer buying from the Chinese shops because they sell cheap goods.”

He added that the majority of Samoan families are suffering.

“Many families are in the same situation, but they just don’t have the heart to admit it,” Toga said.

“The Samoan life itself is all about families and fa’alavelave. We don’t have enough monies for these.”

He went on to say he wants to work. 

“As for my family, my brother is the only one who works,” he said. 

“His pay is nowhere near enough compared to the things we need.”

“This is why I need to work, to help him out.”

“We may have a plantation to take some pressure off of my brother who works, but I still want to work.”

“I want to earn some extra cash for anything needed in the family.”

“I humbly ask of any one or any company who needs someone to clean their land, monitor their homes or anything else to give me a chance to work.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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