Youth behaviour leaves families traumatised

By Vatapuia Maiava and Ilia L. Likou ,

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YOUTH BEHAVIOR IS GETTING MORE AND MORE SCARY: Nomalei Tauaovao, 54, from the village of Nu’u-Fou.

YOUTH BEHAVIOR IS GETTING MORE AND MORE SCARY: Nomalei Tauaovao, 54, from the village of Nu’u-Fou. (Photo: Vatapuia Maiava)

The villages on the outskirt of the Apia township might be a melting pot of sorts in terms of people but it is also increasingly becoming difficult.

Nomalei Tauaovao, from the village of Nu’u-Fou, says she is fearful about the bad behaviour of young people in their area.

When they hear loud music and drunken people on the road, they fear for their lives and hope that nothing bad happens.

The villagers are too scared to approach the rowdy gang of youths.

Nomalei, 54, says the problem arises because of people from different places congregating there, and adding cheap alcohol to the mix really is a recipe for disaster.

 “This land was given to us by the government so I thank them for their kindness so that we may live here,” she told the Village Voice.

“I am also thankful for the government for bringing us good road, electricity and water. My family is very grateful. The only problem we face in our village is the different ideals every family follows.”

“In Nu’u Fou village, we have people migrating from different villages around Samoa and they bring with them their own way of life.”

“It makes life very difficult for us. There are constant conflicts between families’ who have different mindsets.”

Even when explaining the issue, Nomalei refrained from going into too much detail because she fears the youth might target her.

“One of the biggest problems is the youth,” she said.

“I can’t go into much detail on this subject because I fear for my safety. The way things are now; many people are affected by the actions of the youth and that’s why it’s hard to talk about it.”

“When they get rowdy around the village then most of the people just let it happen because if anything were to be said to them then that family will get hurt.”

“We need police in the area to keep the peace.” Nomalei says that they need more police action in the village before it really gets out of hand.

“The closest police headquarters is at the Tuanaimato complex,” she said.

“We need them to patrol our village, especially at night time. So much goes down at night and the youth are always out causing trouble.”

“I feel that another solution is to strengthen the village councils in these urban villages. Having a strong village council will help with police work of keeping the peace and setting the young ones straight.”

The problem occurs every night but mostly on the weekends. But families are starting to come  together for a solution of safety.

“Every night there would always  be drunk people on the road making noise,” Nomalei said.

“Worst is on the weekends. It becomes scary. Family’s here are starting to befriends with one another so we can look out for each other in troubled times.”

“Making friends with other families is very important here, it  provides some comfort of safety and unity against the drunks, especially having to experience scary drunk people everywhere.”

“We sometimes experience that when we are trying to have an evening prayer, we hear loud portable speakers blasting music on the road with a whole gang of youth walking around like they own the place.”

“My only request is for the government to send more police patrols for our village.”

When asked about life in general, Nomalei says that it’s not easy living in an urban village.

“Aside from the problem of the youth my family does go through troubles,” she said.

“We don’t make much money to make ends meet at times because life in the urban village is quite tough. When there are many things happening in the family and we can’t afford it then the burden falls very heavy on us.”

“Even though life is tough, we trust in the Lord’s goodness that he might pull us through any trouble we go through. I know in my heart that God is the key.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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