Village life is stress-free - Kalolo Tasi

By Sarafina Sanerivi ,

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VILLAGE LIFE IS PEACEFUL: Kalolo Tasi from Sauano taking a break from carving.

VILLAGE LIFE IS PEACEFUL: Kalolo Tasi from Sauano taking a break from carving. (Photo: Misiona Simo)

Life in the village maybe hard for some people. But for 62-year-old Kalolo Tasi from Sauano, life is “is stress-free in the village.”

“Life here in the village is very nice and peaceful,” says Kalolo.  

“Everything is fine; there are no challenges.”

Says Kalolo, the art of carving and handicrafts is the main source of income for their village. 

“This is an activity or practice we do to earn money in our village. 

“I am not working on anything this week; I am taking a break from carving. But that is something we do and we learn in this village.”

Kalolo is a faiava to the village of Sauano. And he has been carving for nine years now. 

“I am married to a girl from this village. So when I first came here, this was what the people of this village were doing. 

“So I learnt how to do it and got into doing it as well. And we do it and sell it at the market to get money. 

“Sometimes we take the handicrafts to the market and sometimes we walk around town and sell our hand carved kava bowls (tanoa). 

“We get $200 for the big ones and we sell the small ones starting from $15 upwards depending on the sizes of the kava bowls. 

“And the money we get from it helps us with the development of our families and for sending our children to school. Sometimes we take them  to hotels and resorts because a lot of tourists love taking things like that as souvenirs when they go back home.”

Kalolo said he wants to encourage the people who have this talent to keep doing this craft. 

“This is one of the cultural practices we have in the country, the art of carving and also handicrafts. I believe there are a lot of people out there who have the talent and ability to do this.

“And I want to encourage them to keep doing it to earn money for their families.” 

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