N.U.S. gets state-of-art system

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SkyEye C.E.O. Faasootauloa Sam Jr Saili said the reduced cost was the company’s way of giving back to the Samoa education system.

SkyEye C.E.O. Faasootauloa Sam Jr Saili said the reduced cost was the company’s way of giving back to the Samoa education system.

The National University of Samoa (N.U.S.) has received a state-of-the-art database management system and saved $130,000 thanks to a working partnership with local technology company SkyEye Samoa.

The company recently presented the university with a Central G.I.S. Database of Campus Assets with Mapserver serving GIS data that can connect multiple concurrent users. The system features a Web GIS (2d and 3d) which includes Data form GIS collector with 2cm G.S.D. imagery, consequently the university has become the first university in Oceania to have 3D Modelling of its campus facility and assets.

The N.U.S. commissioned SkyEye to develop and deliver this project within three months with the company handing over the system on June 13. 

The university’s vice chancellor and president Professor Fui Le’apai Tu’ua ‘Ilaoa Asofou So’o said he was pleased with the milestone as it came at an opportune time. 

A project of this magnitude would have cost the university approximately $150,000 ($94,0000 software license, $50,000 consultancy, and $10,000 high resolution UAV Imagery).  But SkyEye delivered this project to the N.U.S. at a modest budget of $20,178.  

SkyEye C.E.O. Faasootauloa Sam Jr Saili said the reduced cost was the company’s way of giving back to the Samoa education system.

“This is part of our giving back to our education system in Samoa as all the founders of SkyEye is a product of the Samoa Government education system. This is not the first time SkyEye has assisted the NUS.  This is an extension of our partnership from the work that we have been providing to the NUS Centre for Samoa Studies particularly with the Archaeology department. SkyEye has the capacity to create viable and affordable solutions for our people, and we have been happy to assist NUS in this project,” he said in a statement.

Tuileva Tuileva from the university’s policy and planning department said the benefits of such technology include: It is digital and editable compared to the old paper system; includes the underground utilities (telephone lines, electricity, internet and sewer); includes contours to enable one to calculate the elevation of certain points on campus; relative accuracy down to five centimeters; and is ideal and simple to produce site analysis plans for proposed developments/renovation.

© Samoa Observer 2016

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