Father’s wish for electricity

By Nefertiti Matatia ,

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STRUGGLE IS REAL: Sauaga Niumata shares his struggles.

STRUGGLE IS REAL: Sauaga Niumata shares his struggles. (Photo: Nefertiti Matatia)

Having no electricity worries a father of two from Aleisa. 

Sauaga Niumata shared with the Village Voice team that where they live is far from the main road and surrounded by bushes. 

This, he said, is the reason he is in dire need of electricity connection. 

Mr. Niumata’s family has lived without electricity for two years.  

As an unemployed father and tasked with looking after his family, he sells his crops at the market every day. 

 “The power does not work. It is hard for me because my children are young and we live all the way in the bushes and there is no light.

“For me, my main concern is my children. As much as I want to have electricity here in our home, I cannot afford it.

“I already have three children who attend school and looking at my budget, my hands are tied,” said the 47-year-old.

Mr. Niumata shares there are many incidents happening in Samoa and he cannot be certain if his children will be safe because they are still really young. 

“I have three daughters and it comes with such a great responsibility making sure that they are safe. For me the only solution is to have electricity.

“We live far away from other families as well and we can never know what might happen. It is very hard to try and earn a living and to make sure that they are safe when I am away.

“I am mostly at the flea market trying to sell our crops. We don’t have anything here to charge our phones for my wife to communicate with me,” he said.

Mr. Niumata also mentioned the condition of their house.

“The house that we live in is not safe. We have problems whenever it rains. The iron roofing leaks and it has also affected the floor of our house.

“We do not have much of a choice. We have to live here. It is closer to the kids’ schools and relocating would cost us a lot.”

Even his earnings from the plantation are not enough. 

“When I manage to sell a lot of taro and banana then there is no doubt that it will be more than a $100. But it barely happens because there are many other farmers who sell their crops too. 

“I have to buy food and whatever my children needs for school, such as the transportation from home to school. Everything would cost us something, nothing nowadays is free.”

For anyone who is willing to help Mr. Niumata’s family, contact 7227799.

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