Sean’s Samoa adventure

By Nefertiti Matatia ,

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CLOSE TO HOME: Sean Skerrit is creating more fond memories on the Island before he leaves on wednesday next week.

CLOSE TO HOME: Sean Skerrit is creating more fond memories on the Island before he leaves on wednesday next week. (Photo: Misiona Simo)

People make the destination. 

Meet Sean Skerritt, who returned the second time to Samoa because of the friendly islanders. 

Four years ago, he came from his homeland, London, to the islands where he met great people and made lasting friendship. 

This is also a special trip because he celebrated his 39th birthday when he arrived. 

“This is my second time. First time I really enjoyed it. I made some friends here and it’s an opportunity to see them again.” 

“I met really friendly people, and their extended families that made me feel like home and it reminds me of the Caribbean which is kind of a bonus,” Mr. Skerritt said to the Dear Tourist team. 

He’s been in Samoa for more than a week. 

Mr. Skerritt noted some changes from his first trip.  

“There are many different buildings, I saw new lounges and bars and new businesses as well.”

“During my first trip, I also experienced sleeping in a beach fale and listening to the waves and admiring the nature and the To-Sua Ocean Trench.”

“This time around I walked up to one of the mountain lakes. I didn’t like the walk because it was slippery and muddy but when we got to the lake it was great, the scene was beautiful.”

“Being in Samoa just makes me feel so eased and relaxed. It’s just a peaceful place.”

Samoan culture makes Mr. Skerritt feel a little closer to home. 

“Samoan culture that resonates with me is family. Having families around on a Sunday and that is something that I experience with my family as well.”

Not only that, he’s parents are from the Caribbean but he was born in London, and Samoa is somewhat similar to the Caribbean. 

“I’ve tried pretty much everything, kokoalaisa, Oka, I’ve had it palusami, taro, we have that in the Caribbean. That’s the main dishes I remember.” 

“The language makes you feel you’re in different place, which is really good. And nightclubs’ closing on a Saturday at 12 a.m. is something really different.” 

“In terms of accent and the broken language, I guess its fine because in London we have people from different countries with different accent and speak broken English.” 

Mr. Skerritt will miss the beaches when he leaves, but he promised his return to Samoa.

© Samoa Observer 2016

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